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Showing 11 posts in Site Remediation.

EPA Issues NPDES Remediation General Permit Renewal for Massachusetts

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) renewed the NPDES General Permit for Remediation Activity Discharges in Massachusetts effective April 8, 2017.  This permit authorizes discharges from contaminated sites as well as a collection of miscellaneous discharges that may be contaminated.  A companion permit was issued covering these discharges in New Hampshire.  According to the US EPA Fact Sheet, discharges from about 750 remediation projects were authorized under the 2010 permits, mostly in Massachusetts.   Read More ›

Lost Insurance Policy? Pursuing Coverage for Long-Tail Environmental Liability Still Feasible

Companies facing environmental cleanup liability typically confront claims that are brought multiple decades after the alleged polluting activity took place. This passage of time often results in the loss or disappearance of crucial historic documents, including insurance policies, necessary to respond to the claims.  Historic general liability insurance policies issued before pollution exclusions became commonplace in the 1970s are of particular value in protecting a company from exposure to “long-tail” environmental liability.  Finding these policies, or evidence of their existence, therefore is a must.  A recent New Jersey federal court decision serves as a helpful reminder that when the actual policies cannot be located, even limited documentary evidence of their existence, when buttressed by the expert testimony of a credentialed insurance archaeologist, may be sufficient to prove the coverage and facilitate recovery. Read More ›

Recent PFAS Case Law – RCRA, CERCLA and Toxic Tort Claims

A new class of emerging contaminants poses challenges at remediation sites and for the protection of drinking water, and is generating new toxic tort litigation. Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) are emerging contaminants that are being identified at several sites in many areas of the country.  The U.S. EPA and many states are beginning to issue guidelines, advisories or in some cases, standards for PFAS in drinking water, soil, or groundwater.  At the same time, several cases are winding their way through the courts.  Below we discuss several recent cases involving PFAS contamination.  In each of these cases, some of the claims have survived a motion to dismiss, suggesting that it will be difficult to quickly dispose of such claims prior to discovery. Read More ›

EPA Proposes to Amend the Site Remediation NESHAP to Remove the Exemption for Site Remediation Activities Performed under CERCLA and RCRA

Summary:  On May 13, 2016, EPA proposed to amend several provisions of the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs): Site Remediation.  The Site Remediation Rule currently exempts from hazardous air pollutant standards remediation activities performed under the authority of CERCLA and those conducted under a RCRA corrective action or other required RCRA order. EPA is proposing to remove the CERCLA/RCRA exemption and to remove the applicability requirement that a site remediation must be co-located with a facility that is regulated by other NESHAPs in order to be subject to the Site Remediation Rule. Comments are due June 27, 2016. Read More ›

Accutest Laboratories New England Notifies Clients of Potential Data Concerns

Notification of potential data quality issues by a Massachusetts laboratory is raising concerns about the possible impact on current and closed remediation sites in Massachusetts that relied on that data.  Read More ›

An Update on Reopening TCE Sites in Massachusetts

The Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection plans to begin contacting some owners of properties with closed trichloroethylene (TCE) remediation sites and requiring them to conduct testing, following a review of approximately 1,000 sites with TCE in groundwater closed prior to the 2014 changes to the TCE standards. We reported in our last edition that MassDEP has been considering reopening such sites contaminated with TCE that had been assessed and closed under older, more lenient regulations.  Read More ›

MassDEP Issues Final LNAPL Guidance

MassDEP issued its long-awaited final policy on how to close LNAPL sites under revised 2014 regulations on February 19, 2016.  The final policy, “Light Nonaqueous Phase Liquid and the MCP:  Guidance on Site Assessment and Closure,” ends a long period of public comment and revision to the guidance that began in July 2014 with the first public review draft.  Read More ›

Updates on the Site Cleanup Program in Massachusetts: TCE, LNAPL and More

The Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection (“MassDEP”) has been updating its policy and guidance to address improvements in scientific understanding as well as its experience in addressing site contaminants.  As we previously reported, significant changes to the Massachusetts site cleanup regulations, known locally as the Massachusetts Contingency Plan (“MCP”), became effective June 20, 2014.  These changes substantially revised numeric standards and closure requirements and modified the assessment and remediation of sites with vapor intrusion, historic fill, and light nonaqueous phase liquid (“LNAPL”).  Today, we provide an update on recent activities. Read More ›

Maryland Legislative and Regulatory Updates

Legislative Updates

Maryland’s annual legislative session ended on April 13, 2015, and with the close of the session came new legislation that affects environmental regulation in Maryland.  Read More ›

Maryland Proposes Hazardous Substance Reporting Rule

The Maryland Department of the Environment (MDE) proposed hazardous substance reporting obligations on Friday, October 31, 2014.  These regulations would implement Environment Article §7-222(d), amended in 2008, requiring reporting to MDE “immediately” of certain information that “indicates the release of a hazardous substance into the environment” above a "threshold."  The law became effective as of October 1, 2009, but without implementing regulations the law has not been enforceable.  The proposed regulations would provide reporting threshold levels, further construe when reporting is triggered, and establish reporting procedures.  Read More ›