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Showing 13 posts in OSHA. View our practice description for OSHA.

OSHA Indefinitely Delays Electronic Reporting Requirements

Last week, the Labor Department indefinitely delayed enforcement of at least the first phase-in deadline of its electronic reporting requirements for injury and illness logs. Specifically, OSHA’s Injury and Illness Recordkeeping and Reporting Requirements website states that:

OSHA is not accepting electronic submissions of injury and illness logs at this time, and intends to propose extending the July 1, 2017 date by which certain employers are required to submit the information from their completed 2016 Form 300A electronically. Read More ›

OSHA’s “Volks” Rule Invalidated

Last week, President Donald Trump signed a joint resolution passed by the House and Senate overturning the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (“OSHA”) rule titled “Clarification of Employers’ Continuing Obligation to Make and Maintain an Accurate Record of Each Recordable Injury and Illness.”[1] The cancellation of the rule effectively means that employers cannot be cited for injury and illness recordkeeping violations older than six months. Read More ›

Introducing Our California Environmental Tracker

The San Francisco Office of Beveridge & Diamond, P.C. is pleased to announce a new series of articles dedicated to developments in California environmental law. California has long been a driver of environmental policy, often setting demanding regulatory standards and leveraging its mammoth market share to compel national compliance. Read More ›

OSHA “Clarifies” Employers’ Injury and Illness Recordkeeping Obligations

In the closing days of the Obama Administration, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has issued a final rule that “clarifies” employers’ “continuing obligation” to make and maintain an accurate record of each recordable injury and illness beyond the six-month statute of limitations under the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 (OSH Act). Once it takes effect, the new rule will allow OSHA to issue citations to employers for the failure to record an injury or illness up to six months following the five-year record retention period that would have applied to such record.  The final rule, published December 19, 2016,[1] is available here.  It aims to overturn the majority opinion in a 2012 ruling by the D.C. Circuit that rejected OSHA’s practice of citing employers up to five years after a failure to record a recordable injury or illness.  It is unclear whether the incoming Trump Administration will attempt to rescind this rule. Read More ›

Impacts of the 2016 U.S. Election on Environmental Law, Policy, and Enforcement

The 2016 election results will have wide-ranging impacts on the future direction of environmental law, policy, and enforcement in the U.S.  With 100 lawyers in offices around the U.S. focused on environmental and natural resource law and litigation, Beveridge & Diamond helps clients navigate legal and business risks arising from this evolving legal landscape. Read More ›

“Oh The Times . . . They are A-Changing:” EPA & DOJ Follow Through on Worker Endangerment Initiative

On October 12, 2016, the U.S. Department of Justice (“DOJ”) announced that four Texas companies agreed to plead guilty to criminal violations of the Clean Air Act at oil and chemical processing facilities, and to collectively pay $3.5 million in fines to the government.  While Clean Air Act criminal prosecutions are no longer rare events, and the total fines imposed set no new records, these cases are noteworthy for three critical reasons:  Read More ›

OSHA, EPA and DOI Increase Maximum Civil Penalties

Summary: This summer, many federal agencies increased civil monetary penalties as much as 150 percent in response to new legislation mandating that federal agencies "catch up" with inflation and remedy past government failures to adopt periodic penalty increases. Interested parties should be aware of these higher penalties, when they take effect, and whether there is still time to comment. Read More ›

OSHA Workplace Safety Reporting Anti-Retaliation Regulations Effective August 10, 2016

OSHA Adds Electronic Reporting Requirement To Injury & Illness Recordkeeping Regulations; August 2016 Deadline For Anti-Retaliation Provisions; Potential For Increased Criminal Liability

OSHA regulations designed to encourage workplace safety reporting and discourage employer retaliation will become effective on August 10, 2016.  These regulations are part of a final rulemaking, otherwise effective January 1, 2017, requiring many employers to submit electronically to OSHA the occupational injury and illness data they are currently required to record. Importantly, OSHA plans to post the data from these submissions on a website available to the public. Read More ›

Pennsylvania Federal Court Dismisses Untimely Medical Monitoring Class Claim

In a decision that may make it more difficult to sustain medical monitoring claims in Pennsylvania, a federal district court dismissed as untimely a putative class action alleging workplace chemical exposure. Blanyar v. Genova Prods., Inc., No. 3:15-1303, 2016 WL 740941 (M.D. Pa. Feb. 25, 2016). Plaintiffs alleged that their employer unlawfully and fraudulently failed to inform or warn them about alleged occupational exposures to sixteen toxic chemicals, including vinyl chloride (“VC”) and polyvinyl chloride (“PVC”). Id. at *2-3. Read More ›

New DOJ Prosecutorial Initiative Blends Environmental and Worker Safety

Companies with Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) citations may face criminal charges going beyond those allowed under the OSHA statute, under a new Worker Endangerment Initiative and Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) announced on December 17, 2015 by the Department of Justice (DOJ) and the Department of Labor (DOL).  Under the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, misdemeanor criminal charges are available only in fatality cases involving “willful” violations of a standard.  Those limitations have resulted in relatively few OSHA criminal cases.  That may be about to change. Read More ›