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Beveridge & Diamond’s 100 lawyers in seven U.S. offices focus on environmental and natural resource law, litigation and dispute resolution. We help clients around the world resolve critical environmental and sustainability issues relating to their products, facilities, and operations. 

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Showing 4 posts by Alan J. Sachs.

Competing Cosmetic Safety Bills Would Each Expand FDA Regulatory Authority

On October 25, 2017, Senator Orin Hatch (R-UT) introduced S. 2003, the “FDA Cosmetic Safety and Modernization Act.”[1] The proposed legislation would amend the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act of 1938 (“FFDCA”) and allow the Food and Drug Administration (“FDA”) to regulate finished cosmetic products based on their safety and the safety of their components. Senator Hatch’s legislation presents an alternative to the Personal Care Products Safety Act (S. 1113), a bill reintroduced in May 2017 by Senators Dianne Feinstein (D-California) and Susan Collins (R-Maine).[2] The Senate referred the bill to the Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions Committee on
October  25, 2017. Read More ›

Comments Due November 1, 2016 on Proposed Update to Framework for Biotechnology Regulation

On September 18, 2016, the Obama Administration issued two major documents in connection with its ongoing efforts to modernize the federal Coordinated Framework for the Regulation of Biotechnology.  The first document, a proposed update to the 1986 framework, intends to clarify the current roles of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) – the three primary agencies involved in the regulation of biotechnology products.  Members of the regulated industry, other stakeholders, and members of the broader public may submit comments on the proposed update until November 1, 2016.  The second document presents a national strategy outlining future steps that the Agencies intend to take to ensure that the regulatory system addresses novel biotechnology product types going forward.  As directed by the Executive Office of the President last year, the Agencies have also commissioned development of a third document by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine (NAS) to address future biotechnology products and opportunities to enhance capabilities of the regulatory system.  The NAS expects to release its report at the end of 2016.  Read More ›

New York State Attorney General Orders Companies to Stop Making Anti-Zika Claims In Connection with Minimum Risk Pesticides and Pesticide Devices

On August 3, 2016, the New York State Attorney General issued cease-and-desist letters to seven companies making pesticidal claims to prevent or protect consumers against the Zika virus.  The claims at issue were made in advertisements for products containing certain “minimum risk” active ingredients, as well as several pesticide devices.  According to Attorney General Eric T. Schneiderman, the letters ordered the companies to immediately stop advertising their products as “Zika-protective” or “Zika-preventive,” which Schneiderman identified as false and deceptive claims.  While the Attorney General subsequently announced that six of the seven companies had either removed the allegedly misleading claims or altogether removed their products from online sales within 24 hours of the Attorney General’s action, his investigation remains ongoing.  Each company may now face liability under both Federal and New York State law. Read More ›

First-Ever Federal Labeling Requirements for Bioengineered Foods Signed Into Law

On July 29, President Obama signed into law a bill establishing first-ever federal requirements for the labeling of food containing genetically engineered ingredients.  The bill, known as S.764, directs the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) to issue rules to establish mandatory labeling requirements for so-called “bioengineered foods.”  In preparing its new regulations, USDA must determine the threshold levels of a bioengineered substance that will subject a food to the labeling requirements and develop a process for manufacturers and others to obtain a determination from the Agency concerning the status of a given food item under the new program. USDA must issue these rules within the next two years, and food manufacturers, technology developers, and other interested parties are expected to have opportunities to submit comments throughout the rulemaking process. Read More ›