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Beveridge & Diamond’s 100 lawyers in seven U.S. offices focus on environmental and natural resource law, litigation and dispute resolution. We help clients around the world resolve critical environmental and sustainability issues relating to their products, facilities, and operations. 

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Showing 9 posts by Jacob P. Duginski.

California Supreme Court Refuses to Take Up Challenge to Cap-and-Trade Program; CARB Confirms Board Hearing Will be Held in July

The California Supreme Court yesterday refused to take up the appeal in California Chamber of Commerce v. CARB, ending litigation that would have struck down a key element of the California Cap-and-Trade program (the “Program”).  The Third Appellate District Court of Appeal had previously ruled against the California Chamber of Commerce’s argument that the Program’s auction of allowances was an unconstitutional tax under state law.  The Court of Appeal’s ruling is now the final say on this issue. Read More ›

San Mateo Gardens Teaches College District a Lesson on Picking Thorny Subsequent Review Procedure

The California Supreme Court recently addressed an important California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) issue: Who decides whether CEQA’s subsequent review provisions are applicable when there are changes to an adopted project? Subsequent review provisions include a subsequent Environmental Impact Report (EIR) or Negative Declaration (ND), a supplemental EIR, or an addendum to an EIR or ND.  When a project that has been reviewed and finalized under CEQA is altered, what type of review process under CEQA is required, if any?  As we said in our last update on Friends of the College of San Mateo Gardens v. San Mateo County Community College District et al., (2016) 1 Cal.5th 937 (Friends of the College), the Court determined that the lead agency makes this determination.  The question that the lead agency should be analyzing is whether the original document “retains some informational value” – if it does, then CEQA’s subsequent review procedures apply.  Should the lead agency’s decision be challenged, then the Court must decide whether “substantial evidence” supports the lead agency’s conclusion. Read More ›

Climate Regulation in California: A State of Constant Change

I.  Introduction

Climate change regulation in California is in the midst of transformation. Last year, the Legislature voted to enact SB 32, extending California’s greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction targets, which were set to expire in 2020, through 2030.  The California Global Warming Solutions Act of 2006 (AB 32) called for a reduction in GHG emissions to 1990 levels by 2020, which California is expected to achieve.  Under SB 32, California aims to reduce GHG emissions 40% below 1990 levels by 2030. Read More ›

EPA’s Plan to Implement Trump’s Proposed Budget Signals Massive Change

President Trump’s recent budget proposal and a more detailed U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (“EPA”) memo regarding its implementation portend a potentially seismic shift in federal environmental priorities and programs. The President’s “Budget Blueprint,” which summarizes his request to Congress for fiscal year 2018 appropriations, seeks to cut nearly one-third ($2.6 billion) of EPA’s funding compared with current levels.  It would eliminate more than 50 programs, defund the Clean Power Plan, and eliminate 3,200 full-time jobs.  EPA has begun preparation to implement Trump’s plan, signaling the dramatic changes that may be seen at the agency should Congress approve a budget substantially similar to the administration’s proposal. Read More ›

The Congressional Review Act: Congress Dusts Off an Old Oversight Weapon

One of the great powers that Congress has to undo changes made by a prior administration is the Congressional Review Act (CRA), which was enacted in 1996.  As of March 17, 2017, this Congress has used the CRA to overturn more agency rulemakings than any Congress before it.  Many more regulations are on the potential chopping block; a lot of them address environmental, energy, and natural resources issues.  With this whirlwind of activity under the CRA, it is vital for the regulated community to stay informed of congressional action in this realm. Read More ›

Introducing Our California Environmental Tracker

The San Francisco Office of Beveridge & Diamond, P.C. is pleased to announce a new series of articles dedicated to developments in California environmental law. California has long been a driver of environmental policy, often setting demanding regulatory standards and leveraging its mammoth market share to compel national compliance. Read More ›

EPA’s Formaldehyde Standards for Composite Wood Products Pose Challenges for Industry, Particularly Importers

Importers, retailers, and others that sell goods containing plywood or other composite wood products face significant compliance challenges from EPA’s new Formaldehyde Emission Standards for Composite Wood Products (the Standards).  The final rule adopting the standards was signed on July 27, 2016 and finally published in the Federal Register on December 12, 2016.[1]  The Standards implement Title VI of the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA).  They are based on the formaldehyde emission limits of the Airborne Toxic Control Measure to Reduce Formaldehyde Emissions from Composite Wood Products (ATCM) of the California Air Resources Board (CARB).  The Standards differ from the ATCM in several ways, but compliance with the ATCM will help substantially as companies work to meet their obligations under the Standards.  The key compliance deadline for the Standards is December 12, 2017. Read More ›

EPA’s Formaldehyde Standards for Composite Wood Products Pose Challenges for Industry, Particularly Importers

Importers, retailers, and others that sell goods containing plywood or other composite wood products face significant compliance challenges from EPA’s new Formaldehyde Standards for Composite Wood Products (the Standards). The final rule adopting the standards was signed on July 27, 2016. The Standards implement Title VI of the Toxic Substances Control Act. They are based on the formaldehyde emission limits of the Airborne Toxic Control Measure to Reduce Formaldehyde Emissions from Composite Wood Products (ATCM) of the California Air Resources Board (CARB). The Standards differ from the ATCM in several ways. But compliance with the ATCM will help substantially as companies work to meet their obligations under the Standards. Read More ›

New EPA Air Emissions Rules Mean Greater Compliance Burden for Landfill Owners

Summary: The United States Environmental Protection Agency (“EPA”) recently released two rules updating the regulation of air emissions from municipal solid waste landfills.  These rules enlarge the potential universe of landfills required to implement emissions controls, provide a new testing method for determining when such controls must be installed, and clarify certain definitions and procedures of the older rules.  Landfill owners should be prepared to shoulder a greater compliance burden and remain aware of how these new regulations are being implemented in their respective states. Read More ›